United States Jewry, 1776-1985 Book

United States Jewry, 1776-1985 | Download eBook Read Pdf-ePub-Kindle

Download full pdf book United States Jewry, 1776-1985 by Jacob Rader Marcus available in full 952 pages, and make sure to check out other latest books Social Science related to United States Jewry, 1776-1985 below.

United States Jewry, 1776-1985

By Jacob Rader Marcus
  • ISBN Code: : 0814344720
  • Publisher : Wayne State University Press
  • Pages : 952
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 401
  • Book Compatibility : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Pdf : united-states-jewry-1776-1985.pdf

Book Excerpt :

The third volume covers the period from 1860 to 1920, beginning with the Jews, slavery, and the Civil War, and concluding with the rise of Reform Judaism.

Recommended Books For Reading


  • George Washington and the Jews
    George Washington and the Jews

    A Book written by Fritz Hirschfeld, published by University of Delaware Press 2005 - 196 pages - part of History books.

    Get eBook
  • The Jews and the Nation
    The Jews and the Nation

    A Book written by Frederic Cople Jaher, published by Princeton University Press 2009-01-10 - 312 pages - part of History books.

    Get eBook
  • What the Rabbis Said
    What the Rabbis Said

    A Book written by Naomi W. Cohen, published by NYU Press 2008-05-17 - 272 pages - part of History books.

    Get eBook
  • The Jews of the United States, 1654 to 2000
    The Jews of the United States, 1654 to 2000

    A Book written by Hasia R. Diner, published by Univ of California Press 2004-08-23 - 447 pages - part of Religion books.

    Get eBook
  • History Lessons
    History Lessons

    A Book written by Beth S. Wenger, published by Princeton University Press 2021-06-08 - 296 pages - part of Social Science books.

    Get eBook
  • American Jewry
    American Jewry

    A Book written by Christian Wiese,Cornelia Wilhelm, published by Bloomsbury Publishing 2016-11-03 - 392 pages - part of History books.

    Get eBook
  • Jewish American Chronology: Chronologies of the American Mosaic
    Jewish American Chronology: Chronologies of the American Mosaic

    A Book written by Mark K. Bauman, published by ABC-CLIO 2011-06-07 - 155 pages - part of Social Science books.

    Get eBook

Read Also This Books

A Bibliography of Jewish Education in the United States

By Norman Drachler
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Wayne State University Press
  • Book Code : 081434349X
  • Total of Pages : 753
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 136
  • Pdf File: a-bibliography-of-jewish-education-in-the-united-states.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This book contains entries from thousands of publications whether in English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and German—books, research reports, educational and general periodicals, synagogue histories, conference proceedings, bibliographies, and encyclopedias—on all aspects of Jewish education from pre-school through secondary education

Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : ABC-CLIO
  • Book Code : 0313028923
  • Total of Pages : 544
  • Category : History
  • Members : 592
  • Pdf File: women-public-speakers-in-the-united-states-1800-1925.pdf

Book Short Summary:

From the nation's beginnings, efforts have been made to silence U.S. women. Yet they spoke. This biographical dictionary, the first of two companion volumes, gives their voices new recognition. Selecting thirty-seven key orators, Karlyn Kohrs Campbell provides entries on a diverse group of women. All were ground breakers--suffragists, the first lawyers, ministers, physicians, labor organizers, newspaper editors and publishers, historians, educators, even soldiers. The volume opens with Campbell's introduction and then provides extensive essays on each of the women included. Each entry begins with brief biographical information and then focuses on the woman's public life in discourse. Each entry includes an analysis of the subject's rhetoric. Entries conclude with information on primary sources, critical works, key rhetorical documents, and selected sources of historical and biographical information. The work is fully indexed.

Jews, Slaves, and the Slave Trade

By Eli Faber
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Book Code : 0814728790
  • Total of Pages : 386
  • Category : History
  • Members : 918
  • Pdf File: jews-slaves-and-the-slave-trade.pdf

Book Short Summary:

In the wake of the civil rights movement, a great divide has opened up between African American and Jewish communities. What was historically a harmonious and supportive relationship has suffered from a powerful and oft-repeated legend, that Jews controlled and masterminded the slave trade and owned slaves on a large scale, well in excess of their own proportion in the population. In this groundbreaking book, likely to stand as the definitive word on the subject, Eli Faber cuts through this cloud of mystification to recapture an important chapter in both Jewish and African diasporic history. Focusing on the British empire, Faber assesses the extent to which Jews participated in the institution of slavery through investment in slave trading companies, ownership of slave ships, commercial activity as merchants who sold slaves upon their arrival from Africa, and direct ownership of slaves. His unprecedented original research utilizing shipping and tax records, stock-transfer ledgers, censuses, slave registers, and synagogue records reveals, once and for all, the minimal nature of Jews' involvement in the subjugation of Africans in the Americas. A crucial corrective, Jews, Slaves, and the Slave Trade lays to rest one of the most contested historical controversies of our time.

City of Promises

By Howard B. Rock,Deborah Dash Moore,Jeffrey S. Gurock,Annie Polland,Daniel Soyer,Diana L. Linden
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Book Code : 0814724884
  • Total of Pages : 1000
  • Category : Travel
  • Members : 841
  • Pdf File: city-of-promises.pdf

Book Short Summary:

New York Jews, so visible and integral to the culture, economy and politics of America’s greatest city, has eluded the grasp of historians for decades. Surprisingly, no comprehensive history of New York Jews has ever been written. City of Promises: The History of the Jews in New York, a three volume set of original research, pioneers a path-breaking interpretation of a Jewish urban community at once the largest in Jewish history and most important in the modern world. Volume I, Haven of Liberty, by historian Howard Rock, chronicles the arrival of the first Jews to New York (then New Amsterdam) in 1654and highlights their political and economic challenges. Overcoming significant barriers, colonial and republican Jews in New York laid the foundations for the development of a thriving community. Volume II, Emerging Metropolis, written by Annie Polland and Daniel Soyer, describes New York’s transformation into a Jewish city. Focusing on the urban Jewish built environment—its tenements and banks, synagogues and shops, department stores and settlement houses—it conveys the extraordinary complexity of Jewish immigrant society. Volume III, Jews in Gotham, by historian Jeffrey S.Gurock, highlights neighborhood life as the city’s distinctive feature. New York retained its preeminence as the capital of American Jews because of deep roots in local worlds that supported vigorous political, religious, and economic diversity. Each volume includes a “visual essay” by art historian Diana Linden interpreting aspects of life for New York’s Jews from their arrival until today. These illustrated sections, many in color, illuminate Jewish material culture and feature reproductions of early colonial portraits, art, architecture, as well as everyday culture and community. Overseen by noted scholar Deborah Dash Moore, City of Promises offers the largest Jewish city in the world, in the United States, and in Jewish history its first comprehensive account.

Studies in Contemporary Jewry

By Peter Y. Medding
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Book Code : 9780195351880
  • Total of Pages : 376
  • Category : History
  • Members : 542
  • Pdf File: studies-in-contemporary-jewry.pdf

Book Short Summary:

How has the Jewish family changed over the course of the twentieth century? How has it remained the same? How do Jewish families see themselves--historically, socially, politically, and economically--and how would they like to be seen by others? This book, the fourteenth volume of Oxford's internationally acclaimed Studies in Contemporary Jewry series, presents a variety of perspectives on Jewish families coping with life and death in the twentieth century. The book is comprised of symposium papers, essays, and review articles of works published on such fundamental subjects as the Holocaust, antisemitism, genocide, history, literature, the arts, religion, education, Zionism, Israel, and the Middle East. Published annually by the Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Studies in Contemporary Jewry series features current scholarship in the form of symposia, articles, and book reviews by distinguished experts of Jewish studies from colleges and universities across the globe. Each volume also includes a list of recent dissertations. Volume XIV: Coping with Life and Death: Jewish Families in the Twentieth Century will appeal to all students and scholars of the sociocultural history of the Jewish people, especially those interested in the nature of Jewish intermarriage and/or family life, the changing fate of the Orthodox Jewish family, the varied but widespread Americanization of the Jewish family, and similar concerns.

Jews and Booze

By Marni Davis
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Book Code : 9780814783849
  • Total of Pages : 272
  • Category : History
  • Members : 796
  • Pdf File: jews-and-booze.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Finalist, 2014 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature from the Jewish Book Council From kosher wine to their ties to the liquor trade in Europe, Jews have a longstanding historical relationship with alcohol. But once prohibition hit America, American Jews were forced to choose between abandoning their historical connection to alcohol and remaining outside the American mainstream. In Jews and Booze, Marni Davis examines American Jews’ long and complicated relationship to alcohol during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the years of the national prohibition movement’s rise and fall. Bringing to bear an extensive range of archival materials, Davis offers a novel perspective on a previously unstudied area of American Jewish economic activity—the making and selling of liquor, wine, and beer—and reveals that alcohol commerce played a crucial role in Jewish immigrant acculturation and the growth of Jewish communities in the United States. But prohibition’s triumph cast a pall on American Jews’ history in the alcohol trade, forcing them to revise, clarify, and defend their communal and civic identities, both to their fellow Americans and to themselves.

Divergent Jewish Cultures

By Deborah Dash Moore,S. Ilan Troen
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Yale University Press
  • Book Code : 030013021X
  • Total of Pages : 368
  • Category : History
  • Members : 215
  • Pdf File: divergent-jewish-cultures.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Two creative centers of Jewish life rose to prominence in the twentieth century, one in Israel and the other in the United States. Although Israeli and American Jews share kinship and history drawn from their Eastern European roots, they have developed divergent cultures from their common origins, often seeming more like distant cousins than close relatives. This book explores why this is so, examining how two communities that constitute eighty percent of the world’s Jewish population have created separate identities and cultures. Using examples from literature, art, history, and politics, leading Israeli and American scholars focus on the political, social, and memory cultures of their two communities, considering in particular the American Jewish challenge to diaspora consciousness and the Israeli struggle to forge a secular, national Jewish identity. At the same time, they seek to understand how a sense of mutual responsibility and fate animates American and Israeli Jews who reside in distant places, speak different languages, and live within different political and social worlds.

Jewish Immigrant Associations and American Identity in New York, 1880-1939

By Daniel Soyer
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Wayne State University Press
  • Book Code : 0814344518
  • Total of Pages : 320
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 113
  • Pdf File: jewish-immigrant-associations-and-american-identity-in-new-york-1880-1939.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Study of a vital immigrant institution and the formation of American ethnic identity.

The Jew in the Medieval World

By Jacob R. Marcus
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : ISD LLC
  • Book Code : 0878201769
  • Total of Pages : 602
  • Category : History
  • Members : 527
  • Pdf File: the-jew-in-the-medieval-world.pdf

Book Short Summary:

To gain an accurate view of medieval Judaism, one must look through the eyes of Jews and their contemporaries. First published in 1938, Jacob Rader Marcus's classic source book on medieval Judaism provides the documents and historical narratives which let the actors and witnesses of events speak for themselves. The medieval epoch in Jewish history begins around the year 315, when the emperor Constantine began enacting disabling laws against the Jews, rendering them second-class citizens. In the centuries following, Jews enjoyed (or suffered under) legislation, either chosen or forced by the state, which differed from the laws for the Christian and Muslim masses. Most states saw the Jews as simply a tolerated group, even when given favorable privileges. The masses often disliked them. Medieval Jewish history presents a picture wherein large patches are characterized by political and social disabilities. Marcus closes the medieval Jewish age (for Western Jewry) in 1791 with the proclamation of political and civil emancipation in France. The 137 sources included in the anthology include historical narratives, codes, legal opinions, martyrologies, memoirs, polemics, epitaphs, advertisements, folk-tales, ethical and pedagogical writings, book prefaces and colophons, commentaries, and communal statutes. These documents are organized in three sections: The first treats the relation of the State to the Jew and reflects the civil and political status of the Jew in the medieval setting. The second deals with the profound influence exerted by the Catholic and Protestant churches on Jewish life and well-being. The final section presents a study of the Jew "at home," with four sub-divisions with treat the life of the medieval Jew in its various aspects. Marcus presents the texts themselves, introductions, and lucid notes. Marc Saperstein offers a new introduction and updated bibliography.

The Jews’ Indian

By David S. Koffman
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Rutgers University Press
  • Book Code : 1978800886
  • Total of Pages : 252
  • Category : History
  • Members : 315
  • Pdf File: the-jews-indian.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The Jews’ Indian investigates the history of American Jewish relationships with Native Americans, both in the realm of cultural imagination and in face-to-face encounters. These two groups’ exchanges were numerous and diverse, proving at times harmonious when Jews’ and Natives people’s economic and social interests aligned, but discordant and fraught at other times. American Jews could be as exploitative of Native cultural, social, and political issues as other American settlers, and historian David Koffman argues that these interactions both unsettle and historicize the often triumphant consensus history of American Jewish life. Focusing on the ways Jewish class mobility and civic belonging were wrapped up in the dynamics of power and myth making that so severely impacted Native Americans, this books is provocative and timely, the first history to critically analyze Jewish participation in, and Jews’ grappling with the legacies of Native American history and the colonial project upon which America rests.

Jewish Reform Movement in the US

By Mara W. Cohen Ioannides
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
  • Book Code : 3110524708
  • Total of Pages : 216
  • Category : Religion
  • Members : 747
  • Pdf File: jewish-reform-movement-in-the-us.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This volume examines the development of the non-liturgical parts of the Central Conference of American Rabbis’ Haggadot. Through an understanding of the changes in American Jewish educational patterns and the CCAR's theology, it explores how the CCAR Haggadah was changed over time to address the needs of the constituency. While there have been many studies of the Haggadah and its development over the course of Jewish history, there has been no such study of the non-liturgical parts of the Haggadah that reflect the needs of the audience it reaches. How the CCAR, the first and largest of American-born Judaisms, addressed the changing needs of its members through its literature for the Passover Seder reveals much about the development of the movement. This in turn provides for the readers of this book an understanding of how American Judaism has developed.

Antisemitism in America

By Leonard Dinnerstein
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Book Code : 0195313542
  • Total of Pages : 369
  • Category : History
  • Members : 118
  • Pdf File: antisemitism-in-america.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Is antisemitism on the rise in America? Did the "hymietown" comment by Jesse Jackson and the Crown Heights riot signal a resurgence of antisemitism among blacks? The surprising answer to both questions, according to Leonard Dinnerstein, is no--Jews have never been more at home in America. But what we are seeing today, he writes, are the well-publicized results of a long tradition of prejudice, suspicion, and hatred against Jews--the direct product of the Christian teachings underlying so much of America's national heritage. In Antisemitism in America, Leonard Dinnerstein provides a landmark work--the first comprehensive history of prejudice against Jews in the United States, from colonial times to the present. His richly documented book traces American antisemitism from its roots in the dawn of the Christian era and arrival of the first European settlers, to its peak during World War II and its present day permutations--with separate chapters on antisemititsm in the South and among African-Americans, showing that prejudice among both whites and blacks flowed from the same stream of Southern evangelical Christianity. He shows, for example, that non-Christians were excluded from voting (in Rhode Island until 1842, North Carolina until 1868, and in New Hampshire until 1877), and demonstrates how the Civil War brought a new wave of antisemitism as both sides assumed that Jews supported with the enemy. We see how the decades that followed marked the emergence of a full-fledged antisemitic society, as Christian Americans excluded Jews from their social circles, and how antisemetic fervor climbed higher after the turn of the century, accelerated by eugenicists, fear of Bolshevism, the publications of Henry Ford, and the Depression. Dinnerstein goes on to explain that just before our entry into World War II, antisemitism reached a climax, as Father Coughlin attacked Jews over the airwaves (with the support of much of the Catholic clergy) and Charles Lindbergh delivered an openly antisemitic speech to an isolationist meeting. After the war, Dinnerstein tells us, with fresh economic opportunities and increased activities by civil rights advocates, antisemititsm went into sharp decline--though it frequently appeared in shockingly high places, including statements by Nixon and his Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. "It must also be emphasized," Dinnerstein writes, "that in no Christian country has antisemitism been weaker than it has been in the United States," with its traditions of tolerance, diversity, and a secular national government. This book, however, reveals in disturbing detail the resilience, and vehemence, of this ugly prejudice. Penetrating, authoritative, and frequently alarming, this is the definitive account of a plague that refuses to go away.

The Rise of Modern Jewish Politics

By C.S. Monaco
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Book Code : 1135114382
  • Total of Pages : 256
  • Category : Religion
  • Members : 659
  • Pdf File: the-rise-of-modern-jewish-politics.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The path toward modern Jewish politics, a process that required a dramatic reconstruction of Jewish life, may have emerged during a far earlier time frame and in a different geographic and cultural context than has previously been thought. Drawing upon current sociological understanding of social movements, this book places the 1827 organized protest in London as an integral part of a transnational social movement continuum—similar to the abolitionist and women’s rights movements—that waxed and waned throughout the 19th century. From its early origins in London in 1827, to Montefiore’s gallant style of leadership in the Middle East, to the rise of the "Mourning March" and street processions of the early twentieth-century, and then on to the civil disobedience of the 1980s, the movement evolved, shifted its contentious center from England to the United States, and adapted to a dramatically altered post-Holocaust environment. This multifaceted and often fractious campaign was never monolithic by nature and was often rife with internal disputes. It ran the gamut between stirring accomplishments and mobilizations that fell far short of expectations. Any attempt to view the lengthy series of international protests as a steady progression of liberality and advancement would be at odds with a far more ambiguous reality. The Rise of Modern Jewish Politics argues that the numerous protest insurgences strengthened Jewish participation in the public sphere and further defined a public political culture. While the movement certainly evolved through the decades, the core values that first arose in London were retained during the course of several contentious cycles that later surfaced both in Britain and the United States. This book utilizes an innovative interpretive framework to formulate a new paradigm of how Jews entered the modern world. The struggle for Jewish rights remains one of the most enduring social movements in modern history.

Jews in Nevada

By John P. Marschall
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Nevada Press
  • Book Code : 0874177480
  • Total of Pages : 456
  • Category : History
  • Members : 937
  • Pdf File: jews-in-nevada.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Jews have always been one of Nevada’s most active and influential ethnic minorities. They were among the state’s earliest Euro-American settlers, and from the beginning they have been involved in every area of the state’s life as businessmen, agrarians, scholars, educators, artists, politicians, and civic, professional, and religious leaders. Jews in Nevada is an engaging, multilayered chronicle of their lives and contributions to the state. Here are absorbing accounts of individuals and families who helped to settle and develop the state, as well as thoughtful analyses of larger issues, such as the reasons Jews came to Nevada in the first place, how they created homes and interacted with non-Jews, and how they preserved their religious and cultural traditions as a small minority in a sparsely populated region.

International Handbook of Jewish Education

By Helena Miller,Lisa D. Grant,Alex Pomson
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
  • Book Code : 9400703546
  • Total of Pages : 649
  • Category : Religion
  • Members : 400
  • Pdf File: international-handbook-of-jewish-education.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The International Handbook of Jewish Education, a two volume publication, brings together scholars and practitioners engaged in the field of Jewish Education and its cognate fields world-wide. Their submissions make a significant contribution to our knowledge of the field of Jewish Education as we start the second decade of the 21st century. The Handbook is divided broadly into four main sections: Vision and Practice: focusing on issues of philosophy, identity and planning –the big issues of Jewish Education. Teaching and Learning: focusing on areas of curriculum and engagement Applications, focusing on the ways that Jewish Education is transmitted in particular contexts, both formal and informal, for children and adults. Geographical, focusing on historical, demographic, social and other issues that are specific to a region or where an issue or range of issues can be compared and contrasted between two or more locations. This comprehensive collection of articles providing high quality content, constitutes a difinitive statement on the state of Jewish Education world wide, as well as through a wide variety of lenses and contexts. It is written in a style that is accessible to a global community of academics and professionals.

The Arc of the Covenant

By Earl Schwartz
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
  • Book Code : 1498596673
  • Total of Pages : 166
  • Category : Social Science
  • Members : 134
  • Pdf File: the-arc-of-the-covenant.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This book explores the exceptional Jewish educational success in St. Paul, Minnesota, in the latter half of the twentieth century. Illuminating the impact of these developments on the local Jewish community in revitalizing Jewish education, the book offers a constructive vision relevant to Jewish education and planning across the United States.

Reader's Guide to Judaism

By Michael Terry
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Book Code : 1135941572
  • Total of Pages : 742
  • Category : Reference
  • Members : 715
  • Pdf File: reader-s-guide-to-judaism.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The Reader's Guide to Judaism is a survey of English-language translations of the most important primary texts in the Jewish tradition. The field is assessed in some 470 essays discussing individuals (Martin Buber, Gluckel of Hameln), literature (Genesis, Ladino Literature), thought and beliefs (Holiness, Bioethics), practice (Dietary Laws, Passover), history (Venice, Baghdadi Jews of India), and arts and material culture (Synagogue Architecture, Costume). The emphasis is on Judaism, rather than on Jewish studies more broadly.

No Place in Time

By Sharon B. Oster
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Wayne State University Press
  • Book Code : 0814345832
  • Total of Pages : 368
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Members : 139
  • Pdf File: no-place-in-time.pdf

Book Short Summary:

An exploration of the temporal function that "the Jew" plays in literature.

Haven of Liberty

By Howard B. Rock
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Book Code : 0814776922
  • Total of Pages : 368
  • Category : History
  • Members : 578
  • Pdf File: haven-of-liberty.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Haven of Liberty chronicles the arrival of the first Jews to New York in 1654 and highlights the role of republicanism in shaping their identity and institutions. Rock follows the Jews of NewYork through the Dutch and British colonial eras, the American Revolution and early republic, and the antebellum years, ending with a path-breaking account of their outlook and behavior during the Civil War. Overcoming significant barriers, these courageous men and women laid the foundations for one of the world’s foremost Jewish cities.

In Hock

By Wendy A. Woloson
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Book Code : 9780226905693
  • Total of Pages : 284
  • Category : History
  • Members : 472
  • Pdf File: in-hock.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The definitive history of pawnbroking in the United States from the nation’s founding through the Great Depression, In Hock demonstrates that the pawnshop was essential to the rise of capitalism. The class of working poor created by this economic tide could make ends meet only, Wendy Woloson argues, by regularly pawning household objects to supplement inadequate wages. Nonetheless, businessmen, reformers, and cultural critics claimed that pawnshops promoted vice, and employed anti-Semitic stereotypes to cast their proprietors as greedy and cold-hearted. Using personal correspondence, business records, and other rich archival sources to uncover the truth behind the rhetoric, Woloson brings to life a diverse cast of characters and shows that pawnbrokers were in fact shrewd businessmen, often from humble origins, who possessed sophisticated knowledge of a wide range of goods in various resale markets. A much-needed new look at a misunderstood institution, In Hock is both a first-rate academic study of a largely ignored facet of the capitalist economy and a resonant portrait of the economic struggles of generations of Americans.

Corner of the Tapestry: a History of the Jewish Experience in Ar 1820s-1990s (c)

By Carolyn Gray LeMaster
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Arkansas Press
  • Book Code : 9781610751131
  • Total of Pages : 622
  • Category : HISTORY
  • Members : 971
  • Pdf File: corner-of-the-tapestry.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Read and download full book Corner of the Tapestry: a History of the Jewish Experience in Ar 1820s-1990s (c)

Jewish New York

By Deborah Dash Moore,Jeffrey S. Gurock,Annie Polland,Howard B. Rock,Daniel Soyer
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Book Code : 1479864471
  • Total of Pages : 512
  • Category : History
  • Members : 408
  • Pdf File: jewish-new-york.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The definitive history of Jews in New York and how they transformed the city Jewish New York reveals the multifaceted world of one of the city’s most important ethnic and religious groups. Jewish immigrants changed New York. They built its clothing industry and constructed huge swaths of apartment buildings. New York Jews helped to make the city the center of the nation’s publishing industry and shaped popular culture in music, theater, and the arts. With a strong sense of social justice, a dedication to civil rights and civil liberties, and a belief in the duty of government to provide social welfare for all its citizens, New York Jews influenced the city, state, and nation with a new wave of social activism. In turn, New York transformed Judaism and stimulated religious pluralism, Jewish denominationalism, and contemporary feminism. The city’s neighborhoods hosted unbelievably diverse types of Jews, from Communists to Hasidim. Jewish New York not only describes Jews’ many positive influences on New York, but also exposes their struggles with poverty and anti-Semitism. These injustices reinforced an exemplary commitment to remaking New York into a model multiethnic, multiracial, and multireligious world city. Based on the acclaimed multi-volume set City of Promises: A History of the Jews of New York winner of the National Jewish Book Council 2012 Everett Family Foundation Jewish Book of the Year Award, Jewish New York spans three centuries, tracing the earliest arrival of Jews in New Amsterdam to the recent immigration of Jews from the former Soviet Union.

Cultures and Contexts of Jewish Education

By Barry Chazan,Robert Chazan,Benjamin M. Jacobs
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Book Code : 3319515861
  • Total of Pages : 159
  • Category : Religion
  • Members : 186
  • Pdf File: cultures-and-contexts-of-jewish-education.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This book examines the history of Jewish education from the Biblical period to the present. It traces how Jews have formally and informally transmitted their culture and worldview over the years, with particular attention to the shift from premodernity to modernity and to the unique opportunities and challenges of contemporary American Jewish education. Its authors combine historical background and insight with educational expertise to provide a robust portrait of the cultures and contexts of Jewish education and address possibilities for the future.

Emerging Metropolis

By Annie Polland,Daniel Soyer
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Book Code : 0814771211
  • Total of Pages : 368
  • Category : History
  • Members : 374
  • Pdf File: emerging-metropolis.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Emerging Metropolis tells the story of New York’s emergence as the greatest Jewish city of all time. It explores the Central European and East European Jews’ encounter with New York City, tracing immigrants’ economic, social, religious, political, and cultural adaptation between 1840 and 1920. This meticulously researched volume shows how Jews wove their ambitions and aspirations—for freedom, security, and material prosperity—into the very fabric and physical landscape of the city.

Lincoln's Jewish Spy

By E. Lawrence Abel
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : McFarland
  • Book Code : 1476639833
  • Total of Pages : 264
  • Category : History
  • Members : 570
  • Pdf File: lincoln-s-jewish-spy.pdf

Book Short Summary:

Born into a Sephardic Jewish immigrant family, Dr. Issachar Zacharie was the preeminent foot doctor for the American political elite before and during the Civil War. An expert in pain management, Zacharie treated the likes of Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, General George McClelland and most notably, President Abraham Lincoln. As Zacharie's professional and personal relationship with Lincoln deepened, the President began to entrust the doctor with political missions. Throughout Lincoln's presidency, Zacharie traveled to southern cities like New Orleans and Richmond in efforts to ally with some of the Confederacy's most influential Jewish citizens. This biography explores Dr. Zacharie's life, from his birth in Chatham, England, through his medical practice, espionage career and eventual political campaigning for President Lincoln.

The Chosen Wars

By Steven R. Weisman
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Book Code : 1416578994
  • Total of Pages : 368
  • Category : History
  • Members : 324
  • Pdf File: the-chosen-wars.pdf

Book Short Summary:

“Weisman’s meticulously researched and fluently argued book is a compelling story of a glorious past. It is also a guide to the foreseeable future. The chosen wars rage on, but now, at least, we have a manual to help us fight them more mindfully.”—The Wall Street Journal The Chosen Wars is the important story of how Judaism enhanced America and how America inspired Judaism. Steven R. Weisman tells the dramatic history of how Judaism redefined itself in America in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries—the personalities that fought each other and shaped its evolution and, crucially, the force of the American dynamic that transformed an ancient religion. The struggles that produced a redefinition of Judaism illuminate the larger American experience and the efforts by all Americans to reconcile their faith with modern demands. The narrative begins with the arrival of the first Jews in New Amsterdam and plays out over the nineteenth century as a massive immigration takes place at the dawn of the twentieth century. First there was the practical matter of earning a living. Many immigrants had to work on the Sabbath or traveled as peddlers to places where they could not keep kosher. Doctrine was put aside or adjusted. To take their places as equals, American Jews rejected their identity as a separate nation within America. Judaism became an American religion. These profound changes did not come without argument. The Chosen Wars tells the stories of the colorful rabbis and activists, including women, who defined American Judaism and whose disputes divided it into the Reform, Conservative, and Orthodox branches that remain today. Isaac Mayer Wise, Mordecai Noah, David Einhorn, Rebecca Gratz, and Isaac Lesser are some of the major figures in this wonderful story.

Irish Questions and Jewish Questions

By Aidan Beatty,Dan O'Brien
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Syracuse University Press
  • Book Code : 081565426X
  • Total of Pages : 270
  • Category : History
  • Members : 306
  • Pdf File: irish-questions-and-jewish-questions.pdf

Book Short Summary:

The Irish and the Jews are two of the classic outliers of modern Europe. Both struggled with their lack of formal political sovereignty in the nineteenth-century. Simultaneously European and not European, both endured a bifurcated status, perceived as racially inferior and yet also seen as a natural part of the European landscape. Both sought to deal with their subaltern status through nationalism; both had a tangled, ambiguous, and sometimes violent relationship with Britain and the British Empire; and both sought to revive ancient languages as part of their drive to create a new identity. The career of Irish politician Robert Briscoe and the travails of Leopold Bloom are just two examples of the delicate balancing of Irish and Jewish identities in the first half of the twentieth century. Irish Questions and Jewish Questions explores these shared histories, covering several centuries of the Jewish experience in Ireland, as well as events in Israel–Palestine and North America. The authors examine the leading figures of both national movements to reveal how each had an active interest in the successes, and failures, of the other. Bringing together leading and emerging scholars from the fields of Irish studies and Jewish studies, this volume captures the most recent scholarship on their comparative history with nuance and remarkable insight.

Hibiscus Masonic Review

By Peter Millheiser MD FACS
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : iUniverse
  • Book Code : 153206585X
  • Total of Pages : 320
  • Category : History
  • Members : 381
  • Pdf File: hibiscus-masonic-review.pdf

Book Short Summary:

HIBISCUS MASONIC REVIEW Vol. 4 / 2019 Editor: Peter J. Millheiser, MD, FACS AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MASONIC HISTORY AND CULTURE Freemasonry In Hungary Between The Eighteenth And Twentieth Centuries An Analysis Of The Draskovich Observance, A Masonic Document Of The Late Eighteenth Century From Croatia The Enigmatic “Code” Of The American South And The Cultural Genesis Of The Scottish Rite’s Mother Council Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography And Rabbi Mendel Lefin’s Book Of Spiritual Accounting In Late Eighteenth-Century Vienna And Philadelphia: A Study In Atlantic History The Impetus For The Grand Lodge Of 1717: The Anti-Apocalyptic “Masonic University” Of Kabbalah The Belgian Wagner Society And Their Link With Freemasonry Distinguished Ohio Freemasons & American Exceptionalism The Apotheosis Of Thomas Dunckerley John Theophilus Desaguliers And The Newtonian Revolution Masons At The Bailey A Hundred Years Of Craft Freemasonry In England This is the fourth volume of an international journal exploring the historical, sociological, literary, philosophical, and cultural backgrounds of Freemasonry. The authors in this collection include some of the leading Masonic researchers and historians and have published extensively on these aspects of Masonic culture

Lincoln and the Jews

By Jonathan D. Sarna,Benjamin Shapell
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Macmillan
  • Book Code : 1466864613
  • Total of Pages : 288
  • Category : History
  • Members : 338
  • Pdf File: lincoln-and-the-jews.pdf

Book Short Summary:

One hundred and fifty years after Abraham Lincoln's death, the full story of his extraordinary relationship with Jews is told here for the first time. Lincoln and the Jews: A History provides readers both with a captivating narrative of his interactions with Jews, and with the opportunity to immerse themselves in rare manuscripts and images, many from the Shapell Lincoln Collection, that show Lincoln in a way he has never been seen before. Lincoln's lifetime coincided with the emergence of Jews on the national scene in the United States. When he was born, in 1809, scarcely 3,000 Jews lived in the entire country. By the time of his assassination in 1865, large-scale immigration, principally from central Europe, had brought that number up to more than 150,000. Many Americans, including members of Lincoln's cabinet and many of his top generals during the Civil War, were alarmed by this development and treated Jews as second-class citizens and religious outsiders. Lincoln, this book shows, exhibited precisely the opposite tendency. He also expressed a uniquely deep knowledge of the Old Testament, employing its language and concepts in some of his most important writings. He befriended Jews from a young age, promoted Jewish equality, appointed numerous Jews to public office, had Jewish advisors and supporters starting already from the early 1850s, as well as later during his two presidential campaigns, and in response to Jewish sensitivities, even changed the way he thought and spoke about America. Through his actions and his rhetoric—replacing "Christian nation," for example, with "this nation under God"—he embraced Jews as insiders. In this groundbreaking work, the product of meticulous research, historian Jonathan D. Sarna and collector Benjamin Shapell reveal how Lincoln's remarkable relationship with American Jews impacted both his path to the presidency and his policy decisions as president. The volume uncovers a new and previously unknown feature of Abraham Lincoln's life, one that broadened him, and, as a result, broadened America.

Civil War Citizens

By Susannah J. Ural
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Book Code : 9780814785713
  • Total of Pages : 252
  • Category : History
  • Members : 894
  • Pdf File: civil-war-citizens.pdf

Book Short Summary:

At its core, the Civil War was a conflict over the meaning of citizenship. Most famously, it became a struggle over whether or not to grant rights to a group that stood outside the pale of civil-society: African Americans. But other groups--namely Jews, Germans, the Irish, and Native Americans--also became part of this struggle to exercise rights stripped from them by legislation, court rulings, and the prejudices that defined the age. Grounded in extensive research by experts in their respective fields, Civil War Citizens is the first volume to collectively analyze the wartime experiences of those who lived outside the dominant white, Anglo-Saxon Protestant citizenry of nineteenth-century America. The essays examine the momentous decisions made by these communities in the face of war, their desire for full citizenship, the complex loyalties that shaped their actions, and the inspiring and heartbreaking results of their choices-- choices that still echo through the United States today. Contributors: Stephen D. Engle, William McKee Evans, David T. Gleeson, Andrea Mehrländer, Joseph P. Reidy, Robert N. Rosen, and Susannah J. Ural.

American Jewish History

By Norman H. Finkelstein
  • File : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Jewish Publication Society
  • Book Code : 0827609752
  • Total of Pages : 221
  • Category : Religion
  • Members : 177
  • Pdf File: american-jewish-history.pdf

Book Short Summary:

This JPS Guide chronicles the extraordinary history of American Jewry. Finkelstein tells the dramatic 350-year story of the people and events that shaped the lives of today's American Jews. Divided into six time periods, American Jewish History describes Jewish life from the time of the early settlers, to the period of massive immigration that flooded the cities, to the incredible growth of Jews in positions of influence in business, politics, and the arts. This is a story of a people who affected not only the lives of Jews in the U.S. today, but also the course of American history itself. There are over 70 black and white photographs, maps, and charts and more than 120 feature boxes and biographies throughout, as well as timelines, notes, a bibliography, and index. Finkelstein has made the saga of American Jewry much more than a compilation of historical facts. This is wonderfully stimulating journey--a worthwhile adventure for readers of all ages.